Tombstone Silver

About


Tickets

Tickets for any of the tours I lead can be purchased online at the Goodenough Silver Mine website. You can also get more information about the tours, or purchase tickets, by calling (520) 457-3333. Of course, if you are in Tombstone for a visit you can always drop by the mine or trolley depot to ask questions; any of our staff will be glad to help you.

About the Historic Trolley Tour

I am proud to drive and lead the Goodenough Trolley Tour around the Tombstone mining district. Our tour is about 45 minutes long and covers all the major historical sites in Tombstone. I also discuss mining and show my guests mining operation sites like an overburden pile (often called a mine “dump”), several air shafts, and an ore loading chute. My tour includes an overlook of the Dragoon Mountains and the city of Tombstone that is perfect for photographs. We drive by both cemeteries and sneak a peek at the Schieffelin Monument (though it can sometimes be hard to see in the distance). You will not find a better or more thorough tour to complement your trip to Tombstone.

Tours start on the hour year-round. The first tour begins at 11:00 AM and the last tour rolls out at 4:00 PM, but those times may be extended a bit during especially heavy days. Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for military and seniors, and $5 for children 8-10 (children 7 and under are free). We also offer discounts when the trolley is combined with the mine tour. The trolley is completely enclosed so we do not cancel due to inclement weather.

For information about the tour, or to purchase a ticket, visit the Goodenough Mine ticket office while you are in Tombstone. If you are planning a future trip to Tombstone, call for information or tour reservations: (520) 457-3333. Of course, you can also contact me, and I’ll be glad to help.

About the Mine Tour

One of my favorite jobs is to lead tours into the Goodenough Silver Mine. Our tour is about 45 minutes long and goes 100 feet down into the mine where I discuss how miners earned their $4/day. The tour starts with the story of how Tombstone got its name (since that is related to our mining), goes past the “Discovery Hole” where the Goodenough mine was started, and down 60 steps to the mine’s first level. Guests see the silver chloride that was left behind, but also several other metals and minerals that were once mined here. We walk through many different stopes (rooms) and drifts (tunnels) over about a quarter-mile route in the mine. This is a unique tour that is unmatched anywhere in the United States. If you are at all curious about how silver was mined in the 1880’s, then this is the tour for you.

Tours start on the hour year-round. The first tour begins at 11:00 AM and the last tour rolls out at 4:00 PM, but those times may be extended a bit during especially heavy days. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for military and seniors, $5 for children 8-10 years old, and free for children under 8. We do offer a discount when this tour is combined with the trolley tour. The mine has a constant temperature of 68 degrees and 5% humidity so we do not cancel due to inclement weather, though it may be a bit wet or cold getting into the mine from the ticket office!

For information about the tour, or to purchase a ticket, visit the Goodenough Mine ticket office while you are in Tombstone. If you are planning a future trip to Tombstone, call for information or tour reservations: (520) 457-3333. Of course, you can also contact me, and I’ll be glad to help.

About the Ghost Tour

Tombstone After Dark is a one-hour ghost tour that departs from the Goodenough Mine entrance. I meet the group shortly before the tour begins and take care of various administrative matters, like checking tickets. At the starting time, I move the group to the portal stope (“entry room”) of the Goodenough Mine where I share some stories about the spirits that haunt the Tombstone mining district. I then lead the group to the trolley where we begin our motorized tour through Tombstone, which includes Boothill Graveyard and the Tombstone City Cemetery. Along the way, I tell stories about the paranormal activity experienced here and share photos that have been sent to me by our guests over the years. The highlight of the tour is an old-fashioned campfire ghost story I wrote about Poor, Ol’ Millie. The photographs, stories, and locations found on this web site are similar to my tour, but there are plenty of ghost stories around Tombstone, so I have not posted anything on this site that is also used on the tour.

The tour runs year-round, but only on Friday and Saturday nights. The tour starts near dusk, so the time is adjusted for the season. It is best to call ahead to find out what time the tour will start on the weekend you are visiting. Also, the tour normally sells out, so I recommend that you purchase your tickets early to guarantee a seat on the trolley.

Tickets for the Tombstone After Dark ghost tour are $20 per seat. We do not offer discounts for children or other populations. If you have a small child who can sit on your lap during the tour, then you will not need a ticket for that child. The trolley is completely enclosed so we do not cancel due to inclement weather. For information about the tour, or to purchase a ticket, visit the Goodenough Mine ticket office while you are in Tombstone. If you are planning a future trip to Tombstone, call for information or tour reservations: (520) 457-3333. Of course, you can also contact me, and I’ll be glad to help.

About the Haunted Hangouts Tour

For several years, guests in Tombstone asked me if there was a day-time ghost tour. At first, the idea seemed odd, but some of our guests are only in town a day or two and want to experience as many ghost tours as they can. Eventually, I created a day-time trolley tour that visits the areas in town that have the greatest amount of reported paranormal activity. To identify those sites, I reviewed more than 450 photos guests have sent me over the past 10 years to determine which sites seem to generate the most number of photographs. This tour visits 15 of those sites and I also share the photos along the way that show paranormal activity. If you are interested in knowing the most haunted locations so you can explore on your own after hours, then this is the tour for you.

This tour is only conducted at 4:00 PM on Friday and Saturday. Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for military and seniors, and $5 for children 8-10 (children 7 and under are free). The trolley is completely enclosed so we do not cancel due to inclement weather.

For information about the tour, or to purchase a ticket, visit the Goodenough Mine ticket office while you are in Tombstone. If you are planning a future trip to Tombstone, call for information or tour reservations: (520) 457-3333. Of course, you can also contact me, and I’ll be glad to help.

About the Ghost Stories

Over the years, I've written several ghost stories. I like to call these "old-fashioned, camp-fire" stories since they are like those I used to hear while I was a boy camping out with friends. This site includes both a written and oral version of each story so you can enjoy them however you prefer.

About the Ghost Tour Music

Guests who take the Tombstone After Dark ghost tour often comment on the music that I play during the tour, Boothill Waltz ("spooky" is a common description). I also use the music as background for my recorded ghost stories because it seems appropriate for those stories. The music was commissioned specifically for my tour, so it is not available to use at a Halloween party or some other occasion. Please enjoy this one-minute sample of Boothill Waltz.

About "Parson George"

For my ghost tour, I use the name Parson George in homage to George Whitwell Parsons. Mr. Parsons was a pioneer and businessman who moved to Tombstone in 1880 and remained for about 10 years. The remarkable thing about Mr. Parsons was that he kept a journal and recorded the daily activity of Tombstone's common folks. His journal gives historians a keen insight into the life of a "normal" person in a mining boom town like Tombstone. As an example, his entry for October 27, 1881, the day after the Gunfight on Fremont Street (later called the Gunfight at the OK Corral) starts: "Snow this morning. Windy and extremely cold and disagreeable…" It was this chance comment that let us know that the weather was unseasonably cold during that gunfight, not warm as expected in the desert or depicted in movies. If you wonder what he had to say about that gunfight, he was out-of-town attending to business at a mine several miles away, but here are his words from the next day:

At Charleston we dined by invitation of H and reached Tombstone about five o'clock. Much excitement in town and people apprehensive and scary. A bad time yesterday when Wyatt, Virgil and Morgan Earp, with Doc Holliday, had a street fight the two McLaurys and Bill Clanton and Ike, all but the latter being killed, and W and M Earp wounded. Desperate men and a desperate encounter. Bad blood has been brewing some time and I was not surprised at the outbreak. It is only a wonder it has not happened before. A raid is feared upon the town by the cowboys and measures have been taken to protect life and property. The "Stranglers" were out in force and showed sand. My cowboy appearance and attire was not in keeping with the excited mind. Loud talking, or talking in groups, was thought out of place. Had to laugh at some of the nervousness. It has been a bad scare and the worst is not yet over some think. ("A Tenderfoot in Tombstone," p 188.)

The "Stranglers" Mr. Parsons mentioned was likely a vigilante group. The Daily Nugget, a local newspaper that was friendly toward the Cowboys, referred to the Epitaph, the other newspaper that was friendly toward the Earps, as the "Daily Strangler." Since the editor of the Epitaph, John Clum, was an advocate of vigilantism it is likely that he supported a vigilante organization that became known as "The Stranglers" among the citizens of Tombstone.

About Your Guide

Me in my role as the trolley driver.

My name is George Self and I have led both walking and motorized ghost tours in Tombstone since early 2009 (one of my favorite jokes is to tell my guests that they are taking a self-guided tour ). In 2019 I began working with the Goodenough Mine company where I added mine and trolley tours to my menagerie. I’ve spent many hours studying Tombstone’s mining, history, and paranormal activity so I can present the best possible tour for our guests.

As far as my personal life, I retired from the United States Army in 1999 and then retired from Cochise College in 2019. Leading tours in Tombstone is my third career and I think that I’ve finally found my niche. My wife and I share our home with three cocker spaniels, though they are pretty much in charge of everything and only tolerate us since we feed them.

About the Logo

The logo for this site is a closeup photograph of layered limestone that is common throughout the Goodenough Mine. The word “Tombstone” was written with Anderson Four Feather Falls Regular font because that looks a bit old-timey to me. It is in a blue-green color reminiscent of the chrysocolla mineral found throughout the mine. The word “Silver” is written in Mistral font that I chose since it is a fun font that I intend to reflect the fun we have on our tour. It is white to symbolize silver, though silver chloride was what was mined and that is dark gray.